Layers upon layers

Yesterday we had a tour of Dartmoor, a national park in Devon. Our goal of course was to visit the neolithic sites, but Phil our guide pointed out many other things that made me look on the land differently.  The longer I am here in England, the more I see how humans have shaped the land. For instance on Dartmoor, there are remnants of terraced fields built by Medieval tenant farmers. On the other side of the stone wall you can see vertical lines that are scars of where miners cut out the soil looking for veins of tin. They still snake down the hills everywhere. In addition, the tin miners constructed narrow water canals that still contain flowing water. At Merrivale, a Bronze Age site with stone rows and a circle as well as remnants of houses, there is a water canal between the long stone rows. 

Humans seems compelled to build and invent and explore. That is the positive take. I could also say control, exploit, and destroy. I'd prefer to believe that our magnificent minds can be used to cherish and honor the planet and all who live on it.  

Hillside  in Dartmoor with marks of mining (rt) and terracing (left)

Hillside  in Dartmoor with marks of mining (rt) and terracing (left)